Fashionable face masks made of Mindanao textile trend as Philippines enters “new normal”

HSBC Philippines
Mindanao Fashionable face mask
Mindanao textile face masks. Credits to Hadji Balajadia of Ateneo de Davao University.

Fashionable face masks made from native Filipino textiles are becoming a trend as the Philippines reopens regular economic activities under the “new normal” condition.

While the community quarantine enforced in the country shifts to General or GCQ status, also referred to as the “new normal”, people have been instructed to continue wearing face masks in an effort to stop the spread of coronavirus disease.

The face masks have thus become standard protective garments for those who need to leave the safety of their homes for essential trips to public places.

The face mask for the general public has seen various versions including four designs of face masks released by the Department of Science and Technology-Philippine Textile Research Institute (DOST-PTRI) for DIYers and manufacturers who wanted to create their own mask either for personal or business use.

The University of the Philippines had also released face mask designs in its bid to encourage the public to make their own instead of buying the medical-grade face masks that are in shortage and should be prioritized for the use of frontliners in the battle against COVID-19.

And now Pinoys are seen also celebrating face masks from local weavers and sewers who use the colorful textile from Mindanao as their decorative designs.

Davao-based designer Windel Mira is now infusing native textiles in his face mask creations such as “Inaul” of Maguindanao and “Dagmay” of Mandaya.

Mira’s face masks have pinch-wire features for a snug fit in the nose bridge area, as well as pocket lining where a user can put his or her filter.

Inaul Face Mask by Davao’s Windel Mira.

Kultura Filipino in the SM SuperMalls also offers reusable masks bearing native prints.

Filipino businessmen and other civic organizations have made the call for the public to support and buy locally made products to help drive up the economy that has been critically hit by the COVID-19 crisis.

Creating protective and washable face masks using native fabrics is also the answer of Filipino weavers and conservationists to lessen the pollution caused by the manufacture of disposable products.

Meantime, Filipino technology has been used by DOST-PTRI in producing for frontliners some 500,000 washable face masks that can repel airborne coronavirus droplets.

SEND CHEERS in the comments below to businesses who champion local textiles in creating reusable face masks for Filipinos.

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Lorenzo Cruz
Lorenzo Cruz believes that the power of beauty could help the Philippines to rise to the top. He is a travel and fashion enthusiast who loves to explore Filipino culture.