KM 43 Instagram

A new fashion line sourced from Philippine indigenous textiles and bearing the mark of Filipino indigenous people craftsmanship has opened in Hollywood.

KM43 is the new clothing and accessories line launched and carried exclusively by West Hollywood boutique and gallery Roseark which carries fashion creations by Filipino-American Kana Manglapus.

The Filipino fashion line recently received the attention of The Hollywood Reporter (THR) which published an article praising the Filipino Chic of the new fashion label.

THR writer Melissa Magsaysay provided the context of KM43’s entry into the Los Angeles scene:

“It’s safe to say that Los Angeles is having a Filipino moment. Of course, the fact that Filipinos comprise the largest population of Asian-Americans in California and Historic Filipino Town, the enclave near Echo Park, was named in 2002 as the first place outside of the Philippines to honor the population, are strong indications of the culture and its significance. But when it comes to food and now fashion, signs of the Philippines’ cultural influence are gaining momentum in a more modern way than ever before.”

Manglapus, an accomplished photographer, art gallery curator, and home furnishings retailer who reportedly has been living in L.A. for over a decade, moved back to the Philippines in 2016 to start her new project.

The KM43 fashion line draws inspiration and sources from Filipino indigenous peoples’ natural fiber textiles woven by the Maranaos, T-boli’s, and Itnegs in creating clothing such as dresses, mini skirts, blouses, camisoles, jumpsuits, shorts, and drawstring pants. Accessories include pouches, fanny packs, weekender bags.

People don’t have to go to Hollywood to find the KM43 fashion line. The KM43 Instagram account is curated like an art gallery with Manglapus posting her creations along with stories about the Filipino indigenous peoples and their craftsmanship.

In this Instagram video Manglapus’ daughter is seen playing on BGC roads while wearing her mother’s KM43 dress.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bm9olx9gSVH/?taken-by=_km_43

KM43 celebrates the Maranao people with an Instagram story about Lake Lanao and how families are engaged in art and craft.

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Handwoven by the #maranaotribe. The Maranao are one of three indigenous Muslim groups native to the island of #Mindanao in the southwestern part of the Philippines. Almost all Maranaos are Muslims, but some groups living in the hills around Lake Lanao are commited to a version of Islam that is fused with traces of pre-Islamic traditions. The spreading of Islam in Mindanao created a differentiation between its native peoples, those those who became Muslim were named "Moro" and those who did not are called "Lumad". The Maranao, who are the first inhabitants of the shores of #lakelanao anao still inhabit this region, the name Maranao means "People of the Lake" or "Lake Dwellers", referring to the indigenous people who inhabited the grounds around Lake Lanao. This lake in North Central Mindanaoand is located at an altitude of 2,300 feet above sea level and can be considered as one of the most beautiful tourist destinations in Mindanao. One Maranao folk tale describes how Lake Lanao was created. The story tells that a group of angels under the control of the Archangel Diabarail (Gabriel) moved out huge groups of people from the area named Mantapoli to prevent the world from turning upside down. The angels lifted the place very carefully and carried it through the air like a carpet, including the people with their houses, animals and crops. It was brought down at the centre of the earth, this in accordance with the command of Allah. The angels filled the hole that was left from the Sultanate with deep blue water, however the water had risen fast and threatened to flood the rest of the world. The Four Winds came to the rescue and created an outlet that was later named the Agus river, the hole became Lake Lanao. Almost every Maranao family specializes in some form of art or craft that is part of the traditional Maranao culture like woodcarving, tapestry weaving, brass-making and the fine art of silver and gold smithing. The Maranao crafts and arts are unquestionably more distinctive and therefore easily recognizable from other cultures of the Philippines.

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KM43 presents unisex pants created with fabric handwoven by the Maranao Tribe of Lake Lanao along with a story on how the fabric has multiple purposes, and even adding a note on amulets.

The Cordillera’s Itneg people and their unique embroidery are showcased in another IG post.

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#details #handmade #embroidery #itneg #tribal #abra #philippines #_km_43 The Itnegs are an ethno-linguistic group occupying the land of Abra on the northwestern portion of the Cordillera Mountains of Northern Luzon in the Philippines. Itneg derives from the combination of Malaysian words I (from) and Tineg (the name of a place and river). The name Itneg is also descriptive of their location because Tineg, is a source a water. It is believed that Itneg is derived from the Ilocano syncopated word used to describe people from other groups, not essentially to describe the people of Tineg. Another word often used to describe Tingguians is Igorot. Itnegs and Tingguians are generally from Abra. To the Itnegs, the Eagle serves as a protector and a guide and gives them warning if there is an enemy.

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The T’boli T’nalak cloth bags from handwoven Abaca fibers are eye candy and quick buys.

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New Colors! Get ‘em while they’re hot!!! “T’nalak is a traditional cloth found in Mindanao island made by a group of people in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato called T'bolis, Tboli Tribe. This traditional cloth is hand-woven made of Abaca fibers which traditionally have three primary colors, red, black and the original color of the Abaca leaves. The colorant of the materials are naturally dyed boiled in with bark, roots and leaves of plants. It is believed that the intricate and creative patterns of the Tinalak was seen in their dreams. They can't create a design of the T’nalak if they haven't dreamed of it. They are sometimes called the "Dream Weavers". The T’nalak fabric holds a special and prominent place in T’boli culture. It is ever present in significant turning points in a Tboli life, such as birth, marriage, and death.” #handwoven #tnalak #tibolitribe #naturaldye #abaca #dreamweaver #km_43

A post shared by KM43 by Paz Kana Manglapus (@_km_43) on

 

View this post on Instagram

“T’nalak is a traditional cloth found in Mindanao island made by a group of people in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato called T'bolis, Tboli people. This traditional cloth is hand-woven made of Abaca fibers which traditionally has three primary colors, red, black and the original color of the Abaca leaves. The colorant of the materials are naturally dyed boiled in with bark, roots and leaves of plants. It is believed that the intricate and creative patterns of the Tinalak was seen in their dreams. They can't create a design of the T’nalak if they haven't dreamed of it. They are sometimes called the "Dream Weavers". The T’nalak fabric holds a special and prominent place in T’boli culture. It is ever present in significant turning points in a Tboli life, such as birth, marriage, and death.” #handwoven #tnalak #tibolitribe #naturaldye #abaca #dreamweaver #km_43

A post shared by KM43 by Paz Kana Manglapus (@_km_43) on

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